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"Losing my faith in humanity ... one neocon at a time."

Sunday, October 24, 2004

The "Naderizing" of the President

posted by Jazz at 10/24/2004 06:19:00 AM

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I found this report buried at the bottom of another NYT story about the relative IQs of Bush and Kerry. Apparently there was an ad campaign launched on Thursday (on Fox of all places!) which takes aim directly at the Presidents core constituency - hard line conservatives.

The commercial made its national debut on Thursday on the Fox News Channel, aimed directly at Mr. Bush's Republican base. It starts with a middle-aged man disgustedly dropping his Wall Street Journal on the kitchen table. "What kind of conservative runs half-trillion-a-year deficits? Gets us into an unwinnable war?" he asks his wife, but adds helplessly, "I can't vote for Kerry."

"Then don't," she says, cheerily suggesting an alternative who is not quite yet a household name: Michael Badnarik, a computer consultant from Austin, Tex.


It's been brought up in passing before, but with all of the attention Nader receives, little has been said about Libertarian Badnarik's potential to siphon votes away from Bush in the swing states. I'll confess, he's so infrequently mentioned in the polls that I had pretty much put him entirely from my mind. The Times points out a few items that might make Mr. Badnarik of greater concern to Bush than most would imagine.

"If we have a rerun of Florida 2000 in Pennsylvania, Michael Badnarik could be the kingmaker by drawing independent and Republican votes from Bush," said Larry Jacobs, director of the 2004 Election Project at the Humphrey Institute of the University of Minnesota, which has been tracking third-party candidates.

Mr. Badnarik, reached by telephone on Thursday while campaigning in Michigan, said that polls commissioned by his campaign showed him at 2 percent in Wisconsin, 3 percent in Nevada and 5 percent in New Mexico.


It has been plain to see how much time, energy, and most importantly, money, the Conservatives have pumped into Nader's campaign in an effort to stop Kerry. The question is, how is it that the DNC hasn't been pushing Badnarik like the daily special at a lunch counter?